REVIEW: HOPE – AN ANTHOLOGY

Reviews on this site will now comprise a book blurb and a short response.

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Hope: An Anthology contains prize-winning and highly commended stories from the Brotherhood of St Laurence Hope Prize. The Hope Prize, established thanks to the generosity of the late Prudence Myer and the support of her family, “encourages writing that transcends stereotypes of ‘the poor’ and reflects the resilience we know that people show in the face of poverty and testing times”. I considered entering this competition, but didn’t, and I was pleased when an author friend, Marlish Glorie was one of the highly commended entrants for her story ‘Machine Man’.

‘Filled with determination and human spirit about people who overcome the odds with courage and strength’ – the Honourable Quentin Bryce AD CVO

‘Powerful perspectives on the world at large from unique and authentic voices’ – Cate Blanchett

This powerful and inspirational collection of short stories filled me with admiration – firstly for the variety and quality of stories themselves, and secondly because of each contributor’s skill in delivering a short story full of punch and heart. Some of the circumstances they describe are wrenching – homelessness, violence, isolation and more – yet all leave the reader with sense of hope, optimism and future. It’s something I live by, the notion that there is a “hope and a future” so these stories struck a chord for me.

Catherine Moffat’s winning story, “Better Homes and Gardens” pulled at my mother-heart, while Katherine Hayes’ “Queen Street” offered a different perspective of homelessness. “Colours” by Eleanor George showed true talent with her snapshot of a young girl turned carer, while Marlish Glorie’s “Machine Man” was an insightful and different portrayal of the lengths people will go to for connection and belonging.

Available from good bookstores (RRP $19.99) and Simon & Schuster. My copy was a gift from Marlish Glorie.